Counter-Propaganda.com

Lithuans

11 06 2014

Lithuans
are Lithuanians or people of other nationalities loyal to Lithuania who believe in the Lithuanian gods.
Lithuanism
is the traditional religion of Lithuanians, faith in the Lithuanian gods.

‘Lithuans’ is a rather broad concept

Lithuans are not obliged to worship all the Lithuanian gods; they can even worship no god at all. However, Lithuans, if they want to call themselves so, must recognise that the Lithuanian gods are the most important to themselves and Lithuania.

In fact even an agnostic or libertine can call himself Lithuan; however, not an atheist.

Lithuanism means recognising many gods

Any Lithuan can have his favorite goddess, god or gods. However, he has no right to declare that only his god (gods) is (are) ‘true’.

Nobody has the right to decide which of the Lithuanian gods are superior to others, and nobody may offend any of the gods worshipped by Lithuans. Though traditionally Perkūnas and Laima are considered the principal patrons of Lithuanians, Lithuania needs all the Lithuanian gods.

Those who claim that one god is superior to all the other gods or that he rules other gods are not true Lithuans.

Laima’s Fir
Laima’s Fir

Lithuans are not obliged to pray or humiliate themselves in front of their gods

The Lithuanian gods are truly powerful and they do not need to prove their power for themselves. Kneeling, humble worshipping, beating one’s head at the ground or other forms of doggish self-humiliation would not bring them any satisfaction. However, the Lithuanian gods do not like being unrespected.

Seeking the help of his gods, a Lithuan has to be faithful to his nation and country, not to betray, and not to behave basely.

The Lithuanian gods pay no attention to mistakes and what others call ‘sins’. Every god and goddess is a personality and helps to the Lithuans he or she likes personally.

For instance, Laima helps not only to travailing women, but also to the cat-lovers – because she herself is a cat-lover. Laima sometimes embodies herself into a cat, so she cannot be indifferent to those who care for her favourite animals.

All the Lithuans are also Baltians and Euronians

Lithuanism is a branch of Baltism, the traditional Baltic faith, and Euronism, the traditional European faith.

So every Lithuan is a Baltian and a Euronian too.

Lithuans do not allow mocking their faith and their gods

Lithuans are very tolerant. However, Lithuans do not have to and do not respect the gods-impostors who claim that only they themselves are ‘true’, that they are better than other gods.

No god who offends other gods and their worshippers, as Jesus or Yahweh (God, Allah), has any right to any respect for himself.

Also the people who claim that only their god is real or that he is superior to the Lithuanian gods, even those who shamelessly try to identify their bloody god with any of the Lithuanian gods, do not have any right to any respect of Lithuans to their faith or religion.

Lithuans are obliged to defend their faith, their nation, and their country

Lithuanism is closely related to Lithuanians and Lithuania. Once Lithuans constituted the overwhelming majority in Lithuania as did Baltians in the Baltics and Euronians in Europe.

But our naive tolerance of the foreigners who worshipped the cruel god of mount Sinai and mocked the Lithuanian gods once barely did not result in complete extinction of Lithuans as well as Baltians and Euronians.

Therefore, we cannot allow the followers of the bloody god who orders his adepts to kill the worshippers of other gods to drown Lithuania, the Baltics, and all the Europe in blood again.

Every Lithuan should learn from history and try not to make at least the most fatal errors again.

What do you think about it?


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